Archive for the Iraq Category

Caliph Baghdadi Orders FGM for Females from 11 to 46 Years

Little girl receiving female genital mutilation (circumcision)The leader of the Islamic State of Iraq and Sham has asked all families around Iraq’s northern city of Mosul to circumcise their daughters or face severe punishment.

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, leader of the self-declared Islamic State, has ordered the female genital mutilation of two million Iraqi girls to “distance them from debauchery and immorality”.

The “fatwa” issued by the Sunni Muslim fighters would potentially affect four million women and girls, the UN resident and humanitarian coordinator in Iraq Jacqueline Badcock told reporters in Geneva by video from Irbil.

“This is something very new for Iraq, particularly in this area, and is of grave concern and does need to be addressed,” she said.

Speaking to BasNews, a spokesman for Mosul police, Ahmed Obaydi, said: “Baghdadi’s decision to have all women circumcised is, as he claims, to prevent immorality and promote Islamic attitudes among Muslims. The decision was made by Baghdadi as a ‘gift’ for people in Mosul.”

Read the rest: Islamic Leader in Iraq Orders FGM for Females.

Two Syrian Women Stoned for Adultery by ISIS

Cartoon of woman stoned to deathIn separate incidents in a span of 24 hours, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) carried out executions against two woman in Syria, sentencing them to death by stoning over allegations of “adultery”.

Unconfirmed reports claim that in at least one case, the woman was sentenced to death as her new husband found that she was not a virgin.

Both incidents of death by stoning have been reported from Al Raqqa Province.

“The Islamic State carried out, for the second time in 24 hours, the punishment of Al Rajem (stoning to death for adultery) against another woman in the city of Al Raqqa in a square near the Municipal Stadium,” an official from NGO Syrian Observatory for Human Rights (SOHR) stated.

The stoning, which was first reported by the SOHR, has also been confirmed by Al Jazeera which claimed that the first stoning took place in a public square in the town of Tabaqa on Thursday evening.

The report noted that the woman was tried at the Islamic Sharia court, where neither the witnesses who made the allegation were identified, nor the man – who is said to be the paramour – was charged.

Read the rest: Women Stoned to Death in Syria by ISIS

Stoning women for adultery is accepted in Islamic law.  Sharia law is based on the Koran and the sunna, the words and deeds of Mohammed, which are recorded in the hadith.

ISIS Jihadists in Iraq Rape Christian Women and Girls for Not Paying Dhimmi Tax

Iraqi Christian grieving. The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) has begun to brutally enforce Islamic laws (AINA 2014-06-14) in Mosul, Iraq, which it overran on June 10.

Dr. Sallama Al Khafaji, a member of the Iraq High Commission for Human Rights, told AINA that on Saturday, June 21 ISIS began demanding a poll tax (jizya) from Christians in Mosul (AINA 2014-06-21).

In one instance, ISIS members entered the home of an Assyrian family in Mosul and demanded the poll tax (jizya). When the Assyrian family said they did not have the money, three ISIS members raped the mother and daughter in front of the husband and father. The husband and father was so traumatized that he committed suicide.

Read the rest: ISIS Rapes Christians for Not Paying “Jizya”

Iraq Set to Legalize Marriage for Nine Year Old Girls

Islam PedophiliaIn a controversial move, the Iraqi parliament is set to legalize the age of marriage for girls as young as 9 years old and prohibits the marriage of non-Muslim women unless it is temporary.

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The Civilized Debate, an organization that defends the civil and human rights of Iraqis through debates reported on its  website that there were 6 deaths and 200 cases of divorces of young girls who were married off as minors last year.

Read the rest: Iraq to Legalize Marriage of 9-Year-Old Girls

It seems the Shia influence in Iraq is pulling the country toward the Iranian model of a totally sharia compliant government.  I feel so sorry for the Iraqi women.

 

 

Sharia Law for Iraqi Women Proposed

Operation Iraqi FreedomIf you think the Iraqi government has reached its limit in violating women’s rights, think again. On 25 February, the Iraqi council of ministers approved a new personal status law called Ja’fari law, named after the sixth Shi’ite imam Ja’afar al-Sadiq, who founded his own school of jurisprudence (Shi’ite). It was submitted to parliament for a vote.

The bill “sets the legal age of marriage for females as nine and males as 15, although it could be even lower with the consent of a guardian, father or a grandfather.

Article 104 permits unconditional polygamy.

Article 101 says men have the right to “enjoy” sex with their wives any time they want, and wives cannot leave their marital home without their husband’s permission.

Article 126 says husbands are not required to pay financial support when their wife is either a minor or a senior and hence unable to sexually satisfy them.

Article 63 prevents Muslim males from permanently marrying non-Muslim females, which means a Shi’ite Muslim male is allowed to marry non-Muslim females temporarily in what is called mut’a marriage. Mut’a is when a man who wants to have sex with a woman “marries” her in the presence of a religious figure, who acts as a mut’a broker. The man will specify how long the marriage will last, ranging from a few hours to many years.

Read the rest: New Iraqi Bill Would Legalize Marital Rape and Child Marriage.

This is none other than Islamic sharia law with a Shia flavor. This is what American soldiers fought and lost their lives for?  How sad.

Honor Killings: Iraq, Afghanistan, Yemen and Canada

honor-killing-beheadingIraq

The practice of honor killing is deeply ingrained in the fabric of Iraqi culture, and there are signs that they are increasing and shifting from the countryside to cities.

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At the heart of the honor killing problem in Iraq is the disparity in treatment between men and women.  The gender gap is a part of Iraqi culture, and it is both founded on and sustained by the country’s laws and prevailing religious beliefs.

Afghanistan 
A young couple in conservative southern Afghanistan have been found beheaded, apparently killed for having a love affair outside of marriage, officials said on Wednesday.

Police investigating the case said they believed the family of the woman, aged around 20, was responsible for the murders in the southern province of Helmand, a lawless hotbed of the Taliban insurgency.  (h/t to Weasel Zippers)

Yemen

“Honour killings are a problem in Yemen, a deeply tribal and conservative country,” Ahmed al-Qureshi, Yemen’s most prominent child advocate and Head of Seyaj organization, told OnIslam.net.

Canada  

Honour crimes have been committed in Quebec in all communities and the government needs to act on the growing phenomenon, Quebec’s Conseil du statut de la femme said Wednesday as it released a report careful not to stigmatize any one group.
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More has to be done, the report says, to protect vulnerable women and girls subjected to genital mutilations, virginity testing, forced marriages and excessive control.

But of the 17 incidents identified as honour crimes in Canada since 1991 and examined in the report, all involved stabbing, strangulation, shooting and beating. They affected 26 victims, five of whom died, according to the 167-page report that makes seven recommendations to the government.

 

Stats on Gender Oppression in Islamic Countries

Drawing of Muslim womenEgypt is the worst country for women in the Arab world, closely followed by Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Syria and Yemen, according to gender experts surveyed in a Thomson Reuters Foundation poll released on Tuesday.

Comoros, Oman, Kuwait, Jordan and Qatar came top of the survey, which assessed 22 Arab states on violence against women, reproductive rights, treatment of women within the family, their integration into society and attitudes towards a woman’s role in politics and the economy.

The results were drawn from answers from 336 gender experts invited to participate in an online survey by the foundation, the philanthropic arm of the news and information company Thomson Reuters, in August and September.

Questions were based on key provisions of the U.N. Convention to Eliminate All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), which 19 Arab states have signed or ratified.

The poll assessed violence against women, reproductive rights, treatment of women within the family, their integration into society and attitudes towards a woman’s role in politics and the economy.

Experts were asked to respond to statements and rate the importance of factors affecting women’s rights across the six categories. Their responses were converted into scores, which were averaged to create a ranking.

Read the stats on gender oppression in Islamic countries. 

Banaz: A Kurdish Honor Killing in Britain

Banaz-MahmodBorn in 1985, Banaz Mahmod was a Kurdish Muslim whose parents, having been granted asylum by the U.K., took her from Saddam’s Iraq to a pleasant-looking neighborhood in London. 

The usual “cultural clash” resulted. In 2002, when Banaz’s older sister, Bekhal, started acting like an ordinary English girl, her brother lured her to a remote location and tried to strangle her to death. When she freed herself with a good kick and challenged him – saying, “Look what you’re doing, you’re trying to kill me!” – he “started to cry like a woman” and explained that their father had put him up to it. Bekhal, taking the hint, cleared out, cutting off all ties to her family and community.

Banaz wasn’t so lucky. At age seventeen, her parents married her off to an illiterate chap, Ali, who was “literally just off the plane from Iraq” and whom she’d only met once. From the beginning, he routinely beat and raped her.

Read the rest of Bruce Bawer’s review of  the documentary: Banaz:  A Love Story.

If you want to understand the tribal Honor/Shame culture concept and learn more of Banaz’ story, watch the documentary here.

FGM in Kurdistan: a Documentary

female-circumcisionA young girl is given a plastic bag of sweets and a bottle of lemonade after being genitally mutilated … the story of the 10-year fight against female genital mutilation by two film-makers has been made into a hour long documentary by the Guardian and BBC Arabic and will go out across the Arab world from Friday, reaching a combined global audience of 30 million viewers.

It started out as a film about a practice that has afflicted tens of millions of women worldwide. It culminated in a change in the law.
Ten years after they embarked on a documentary to investigate the extent of female genital mutilation in Kurdistan (northern Iraq), two film-makers have found their work changing more than just opinions in a fiercely conservative part of the world. Partly as a result of the film, the numbers of girls being genitally mutilated in the villages and towns of Iraqi Kurdistan has fallen by more than half in the last five years.

The film-makers’ work began in 2003, shortly after the fall of Saddam Hussein. The stories they were told had a numbing consistency. In one scene in the documentary a young mother with her children sitting beside her tells Shara that in their village: “They would just grab the little girls, take them and cut them, and the girls came back home. I can still remember I was sick, infected for three months. I could barely walk after I was cut.”

A mullah tells the film-makers that “Khatana [the Kurdish term for FGM] is a duty; it is spiritually pure.” That is the position of the Shafi’i school of Sunni Islam that is practiced by Iraqi Kurds. It is the same branch of Islamic law that predominates in Egypt, where studies show that up to 80% of women have been mutilated. But FGM is not just confined to some Muslim countries in the Middle East – it is also widespread in parts of Africa and Indonesian. It pre-dates Islam or Christianity and is on record since the time of the Pharaoh.
“It is about controlling women’s sexuality and keeping them under control,” said Nadya Khalife, from Human Rights Watch.
There are an estimated 140 million girls and women worldwide living with the effects of FGM, the World Health Organization estimates.

Read the rest: New Documentary on FGM in Kurdistan.

See the documentary on You Tube here.

FGM in Kurdistan

iraqi-kurdish-four-year-old-shwen-screams-during-her-circumcisionIraqi Kurdistan region is one of the areas where female genital mutilation is reportedly widely practiced but inadequately studied. The aim of this study was to determine (i) the prevalence of female genital mutilation among Muslim Kurdish women in Erbil city, (ii) the patterns and types of female genital mutilation, (iii) the factors associated with this practice and (iv) women’s knowledge and attitudes towards this practice. 

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in the primary health care centers and the Maternity Teaching Hospital in Erbil city, involving 1987 women aged 15–49 years.

Data were obtained about female genital mutilation status and knowledge and perception towards this practice. The participants were clinically examined to verify the self-reported female genital mutilation status.

Results: The self-reported prevalence of female genital mutilation was 70.3%, while it was 58.6% according to clinical examination of the women’s genitalia.

The most common type of female genital mutilation was type I (99.6%) and the most common age at which mutilation was performed was 4–7 years (60.2%). This practice was mostly performed by traditional birth attendants (72.5%).

Only 6.4% of mutilated women reported having complications after mutilation, most commonly bleeding (3.6%). The practice was more reported among housewives (OR = 3.3), those women whose mothers were mutilated (OR = 15.1) or with unknown mutilation status (OR = 7.3) and those women whose fathers were illiterate (OR = 1.4) or could only read and write (OR = 1.6).

The common reasons for practicing female genital mutilation were cultural tradition (46.7%) and dictate of religion (38.9%). Only 30% of the participants were aware about the health consequences of female genital mutilation.

Read the rest here.

For more information on FGM, Type 1, see here (with images) :  and here (description only) .